Tomatillo - Physalis philadelphica

 

De Milpa - These grow unattended in family corn fields and are harvested for home use and for selling in town on market day. High dry matter, small to medium, round fruits store fresh for several weeks, handy for fresh salsa. Portions of the fruits blush with purple, especially after harvest.

Tomatillo - Physalis pruinosa 

 

Ground cherry - . .A conversation piece at markets, well liked by children. This old-fashioned tomato family member bears 1/2- 3/4" sweet golden berries inside papery husks, resembling small, straw-colored Japanese lanterns. The flavor is quite sweet and a bit wild. Plants are profusely branching, prolific, and drop ripe fruits. Fruits can be eaten raw, dried like raisins, frozen, canned, or made into preserves, cooked pies, and desserts

 

 

Tomatillo - Physalis Peruviana

 

Peruvian gooseberry - This old-fashioned tomato family member bears 1/2- 3/4" sweet golden berries inside papery husks, resembling small, straw-colored Japanese lanterns. The flavor is quite sweet and a bit wild. Plants are profusely branching, prolific, and drop ripe fruits. Fruits can be eaten raw, dried like raisins, frozen, canned, or made into preserves, cooked pies, and desserts

 

 

Tomatillo - Physalis ixocarpa  

 

Husk Tomato Pineapple - This is an Eastern European relative of the more common Mexican tomatillo, adding a delightful twist to your table. The plants grow in a spreading bushy habit, and the golden fruit have a distinct flavor very reminiscent of pineapple, but without the acidity. A great addition to salsas and sauces, and wonderful for jams and pies. Try putting them before your friends and watch them go crazy trying to figure out what this amazingly good fruit is!

  • Facebook Round
  • Vimeo Round
  • YouTube Round
  • Twitter Round