Molokia

 

Egyptian (Egyptian strain) A continuous harvest plant eaten by the Ancient Egyptians and just about everyone else from Egypt and Sierra Leone to the Sudan. Used in salads. In Egypt it is considered a national dish. According to a legend and early Pharaoh who had fallen seriously ill had been cured after beginning a diet of Molokia. The Pharaoh was cured and Molokia was held in high esteem ever since. It is extremely rich in Vitamin E and hence helps to fight health ailments related to free radical damage such as hardening arteries, arthritis, heart and kidney problems. Thanks to its high content of Vitamin A and C it can help to improve eye sight and prevent several eye problems such as cataracts. The high content of calcium helps to strengthen teeth and bones. High vitality properties

Chenopodium nuttalliae

 

Red Aztec spinach - (Huauzontle) A relative of quinoa and spinach.Basically, a quinoa bred from wild Amaranth (calaloo) and wild quinoa for mild leafy greens.Sprouts quickly for baby leaves for salad mix. Leaves taste like spinach, with no oxalic acid "metallic" taste. If you’ve tried amaranth, lambs quarter, or goosefoot as salad or micro-greens, you should try this. The germination is terrific. Young seedlings begin bright red, then look like lambs quarter with reddish undersides and a crisper leaf. Gives the salad mix a wilder look and taste. Leaves and seed heads become bright red with maturity

Basella alba

 

Green leaf Malabar - (Central Asian strain, Central American origin) a beautiful summer perennial (wild) Ancient and native to Africa and Southeast Asia, It produces fast, luxuriant growth; A true spinach used in salads,. Highly nourishing.Vigorous climbing vines grow through summer into fall. Glossy, thick, savoyed leaves resemble spinach. Mild Swiss chard taste. Use leaves and young stems sparingly in salads or stir-fries. Direct seed 1-2" apart, 1/4" deep, or start indoors and transplant outside after danger of frost

Basella alba

 

Red leaf Malabar (Central Asian strain, Central American origin) a beautiful summer perennial (wild) Ancient and native to Africa and Southeast Asia, It produces fast, luxuriant growth; A true spinach used in salads,. Highly nourishing. Highly nourishing.Vigorous climbing vines grow through summer into fall. Glossy, thick, savoyed leaves resemble spinach. Mild Swiss chard taste. Use leaves and young stems sparingly in salads or stir-fries. Direct seed 1-2" apart, 1/4" deep, or start indoors and transplant outside after danger of frost

Tetragonia tetragonioides

 

New Zealand - is not really a proper spinach at all. It looks and tastes similar to its namesake, but technically its botanical classification is a little different. Nonetheless, this tasty and fascinating indigenous veggie has been grown since the 1770’s after being initially introduced by famed British botanist Sir Joseph Banks,. It is particularly noted for its extremely high vitamin content.

Chenopodium

 

Orache - This ancient spinach type has been dished up since antiquity. This lushes vegetable will stretch to a grand height of 2m, whereby regular harvest always encourages its growth

Chenopodium capitatum

 

Strawberry Spinach-  An old-fashioned plant that dates to 1600 in Europe. This curious plant produces greens that are picked and cooked like spinach, but it also produces attractive, red berries that are bland in flavor. These add a nice touch to fruit salads. Easy-to-grow plants are similar to "Lamb's Quarters", a wild relative. Found in a monastery garden

Chenopodium nuttalliae

 

Aztec Spinach (Huauzontle) A relative of quinoa and spinach Basically, a quinoa bred from wild Amaranth (calaloo) and wild quinoa  for mild leafy greens. Sprouts quickly for baby leaves for salad mix. Leaves taste like spinach, with no oxalic acid "metallic" taste. . .

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